nkjpg:

dolce & gabbana 2014 spring 

michaelmoonsbookshop:

Cunning Cookery 1938

Late night bookmaking— party of 2

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mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.
mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.

mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.

cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 
My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.

cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 

My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.
Via
bookriot:

Bookends, bookshelves, book pillows, and more in Book Fetish.
bookriot:

Bookends, bookshelves, book pillows, and more in Book Fetish.
bookriot:

Bookends, bookshelves, book pillows, and more in Book Fetish.
bookriot:

Bookends, bookshelves, book pillows, and more in Book Fetish.

bookriot:

Bookends, bookshelves, book pillows, and more in Book Fetish.

petitestitches:

New design: Forest Critters - Badger  
petitestitches:

New design: Forest Critters - Badger  

petitestitches:

New design: Forest Critters - Badger  


HARRY POTTER SPELLS: a summary

HARRY POTTER SPELLS: a summary

HARRY POTTER SPELLS: a summary

HARRY POTTER SPELLS: a summary
HARRY POTTER SPELLS: a summary
Via
"The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village."
Roald Dahl, Matilda (via bookporn)

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Award-winning artist Katharine Morling creates whimsical and often outlandish sculpture from porcelain and ceramics. Instead of simply making the pieces and leaving them in their ceramic form, the added touch of black in certain spots creates an illusive effect, making the everyday objects look like drawings in real life.

Via
Via

blondeonblondelove:

Dolly Parton in the 1970’s

i can’t not reblog this every time